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Overcoming the Pain of Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury.

Updated: May 16, 2023


Find out about he long-term effects of untreated whiplash.
Find out about he long-term effects of untreated whiplash.


Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury (WRSI) is a painful and debilitating condition that can be caused by a variety of factors, from car accidents to repetitive motion at work. Understanding the causes of WRSI and the treatments available is key to managing this condition and regaining quality of life.


Causes of Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury

WRSI is typically caused by a sudden, forceful movement of the neck or upper body that causes damage to the soft tissues of the neck and spine. This can happen in car accidents, falls, or other traumatic events. Repetitive stress injuries can also cause WRSI, particularly for those who work in jobs that require repetitive motions or prolonged periods of sitting or standing in awkward positions.


Physicians Who Treat Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury

Several types of physicians can treat WRSI, including orthopedic specialists, chiropractors, physical therapists, and pain management specialists. These healthcare providers can evaluate the extent of the injury and recommend a treatment plan that may include medication, physical therapy, massage therapy, or other modalities.


Treatment of Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury

The treatment for WRSI will depend on the extent of the injury and the specific symptoms experienced by the patient. Treatment may include rest, ice, and heat therapy to reduce inflammation and pain, as well as physical therapy to help restore range of motion and build strength in the affected area. Pain management techniques such as acupuncture, massage therapy, or chiropractic adjustments may also be used to manage symptoms.


Level of Pain of Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury

The pain of WRSI can vary widely depending on the severity of the injury and the specific symptoms experienced by the patient. Some people may experience mild to moderate pain, while others may experience severe pain that interferes with daily activities.


Where Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury Can Happen

WRSI can happen anywhere, but it is most commonly associated with car accidents and workplace injuries. Those who work in jobs that require repetitive motion or prolonged periods of sitting or standing in awkward positions may be at increased risk of developing WRSI.


Areas of the Body Affected by Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury

WRSI can affect several areas of the body, including the neck, upper back, and shoulders. Common symptoms of WRSI may include neck pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion, as well as headaches, dizziness, and fatigue.


Studies Pertaining to Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury

Several studies have been conducted on the causes and treatment of WRSI.

A 2019 study published in the Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and Research found that early physical therapy intervention can improve outcomes for patients with WRSI. Another study published in the journal Pain Management Nursing in 2018 found that massage therapy can be an effective treatment for WRSI-related pain.


Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury can be a challenging condition to manage, but with the right treatment plan and support from healthcare providers, it is possible to overcome the pain and regain quality of life. If you or someone you know is struggling with WRSI, don’t hesitate to seek medical attention and explore the available treatment options.


Citations referring to Whiplash Repetitive Stress Injury

  1. Meisingset I, Woodhouse A, Stensdotter AK, et al. Evidence for a general stiffening motor control pattern in neck pain: a cross-sectional study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2020;21(1):352. doi: 10.1186/s12891–020–03345–6. https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12891-020-03345-6

  2. Anwar F, Saleem M, Hameed A, Aslam HM. Prevalence and risk factors associated with whiplash injury after road traffic collisions in Lahore, Pakistan. Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg. 2019;45(6):1115–1121. doi: 10.1007/s00068–019–01118–2. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00068-019-01118-2

  3. Sterling M, Hendrikz J, Kenardy J, Kristjansson E, Dumas JP, Niere K, et al. Assessment and validation of prognostic models for poor functional recovery 12 months after whiplash injury: a multicentre inception cohort study. Pain. 2012;153(8):1727–1734. doi: 10.1016/j.pain.2012.04.011. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22633909/

  4. Ferrari R, Russell AS, Carroll LJ, Cassidy JD. A re-examination of the whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) as a systemic illness. Ann Rheum Dis. 2005;64(9):1337–1342. doi: 10.1136/ard.2004.034447. https://ard.bmj.com/content/64/9/1337

  5. Hincapié CA, Cassidy JD, Côté P, et al. Whiplash injury is more than neck pain: a population-based study of pain localization after traffic injury. J Occup Environ Med. 2010;52(4):434–440. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181d073c7. https://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/2010/04000/Whiplash_Injury_Is_More_Than_Neck_Pain__A.7.aspx

References:

  1. PubMed: www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

  2. Google Scholar: scholar.google.com

  3. ResearchGate: www.researchgate.net

  4. The Cochrane Library: www.cochranelibrary.com

  5. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI): www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

  6. New York Pain Doctors: www.newyorpaindoctors.com (NYPMD)

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